The Psalmist Jason Akley

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Kindle Edition

639 pages


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The Psalmist  by  Jason Akley

The Psalmist by Jason Akley
| Kindle Edition | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, talking book, mp3, ZIP | 639 pages | ISBN: | 7.20 Mb

He knew it was poison, but he drank it anyways... Thats what they say about Robert Johnson. He sang the Blues. And what if he was like King David in the bible (a singer of the Blues in his own right)--what if his heart was right with God, but heMoreHe knew it was poison, but he drank it anyways...

Thats what they say about Robert Johnson. He sang the Blues. And what if he was like King David in the bible (a singer of the Blues in his own right)--what if his heart was right with God, but he sold his soul to the Devil?This is what I explored in The Psalmist.

Ive been writing for over fifteen years. Im a graduate of Tulane University (class of 97) with a bachelors in physics and mathematical economics--not your normal English major route and on to a MFA--I received an AFROTC scholarship in physics. The Psalmist is my eighth book written as a biography of a blues musician with hints to the life of King David and Robert Johnson.

The Psalmist is a large work, but the story is carefully structured--33 chapters separated into five books to correlate to the book of Psalms and its relation to the Pentateuch. I hope it piques your interest.KIRKUS REVIEW:A sprawling novel detailing the life of a 20th-century blues musician.Akleys lengthy fiction debut tells the story of a blues musician named David Threnody, who was born in an apartment above a pawn shop on 129 N 8th Street in East St.

Louis, Ilinois...in winter, the 28th of February 1918. Akley uses a variety of techniques--including journal entries and a long stretch of prose structured as a stage play--to first outline the lives of Davids parents and then to tell Davids own life from his childhood to his slow, spotty entrance onto the music scene in New Orleans and its environs. Remember laughter is a tool like anything else, Davids mother writes. Its a tool for Hope. Yet theres barely any humor in this long book and virtually no hope, either.

Instead, through the viewpoints of a handful of characters but always returning to center on David, Akley takes readers through the ups and downs of Davids life, his music, his problems with the law, and his struggles with drugs and alcohol. Davids morose and brooding nature governs the story, seen most directly in excerpts from his own journals: No good habits come from idle time. Bodies just rot that way. Through the long, complicated stories of Davids love life and tense family relationships, Akley shapes a narrative of a down-and-out bluesman who grows into a kind of hard-won wisdom.

He was kind of a preacher you know, one character says of him. And his songs were laments. Like it was all vanity to him. A striving after the wind. Akley consistently displays great skill in both moving the story briskly along despite its great length and in controlling the tempo, sometimes speeding it up and peppering it with tragedies or sometimes slowing it down and filling it with memorable philosophical observations: Truth is memory when youre sad. Its the present moment when youre happy. A sordid, off-tempo ending adds extra resonance to the story of Davids bleak but fascinating life.An absorbing artists story with a similar structure but darker tone than Irving Stones The Agony and the Ecstasy (1961).Check out the authors blog:  jasonakley.wordpress.com/



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